Art is to console those who are broken by life. Vincent VanGogh

Healing in Arts

A mother with her young children hang a Hope Card on the Healing Tree at ArtPrize 2011Healing in Arts successfully creates community with a new healing paradigm for art making in a world where rapid cultural fragmentation alienates us. A superficial world where people ricochet from one activity to the next. A cyber culture where we rack up 5,847 synthetic Facebook friends. A culture where we spend less and less real face time within meaningful relationships.

Well-known artist Makoto Fujimura explains how my art facilitates healing: “Art that focuses on the audience rather than the artist’s need for self-expression is unique. A paradigm shift.” By serving others and inviting soul care, the art helps unlock people and move them towards human flourishing.

For example in 2014 after viewing The Scarlet Cord, an anti-sex trafficking installation, a middle-aged woman leaned into me and released a heavy sigh, I felt it to the core. Then she walked away. Not a single word was spoken. But something transpired. Whether large or small, this woman experienced healing—at an art installation.

In the midst of our rapid growing cyber culture where increased isolation breeds loneliness, the viewers feel validated and cared for; their stories underscore the need for creating donor supported Healing in Arts. Time and again visitors experience what T.S. Eliot calls the still point: A significant place in time. A moment of release where change and transformation begin. Healing in Arts, through the art making, builds healthy communities where real people experience renewal and healing.

Pamela Alderman

Viewer Responses

There is powerful healing through the art because it opens the emotions unlike a book or a sermon or mere words.
Your art helps us emotionally connect to issues we might only understand on the intellectual level.
I could not hold back my tears. Thank you so much for creating a work of art that we could all be a part of and leave our mark on.
Just the act of writing the message and hanging it on the tree made me feel like I was part of the healing process.

Donor Responses

The artist's personal interactions with individuals is resulting in changed lives. Lyn
Pamela Alderman boldly uses her artistic gifts to bring attention, hope, and healing to different aspects of our broken world. I love being a part of that. Priscilla
We believe strongly in the power of your art to provide a space of healing for so many. Thank you for letting us be a part of this community outreach.

Volunteer Responses

As a volunteer, I can say that working alongside Pamela and her work is more than a commitment, it is an opportunity. My heart has been touched as I have seen firsthand how Pamela's work impacts so many people on a soul level. I have grown in compassion as I have listened to people share deep wounds and great joys; I have learned to be silent as I have watched tears roll down faces. Even though I am the one serving—in many ways it is I who am served—because of this opportunity. Kathy Pluymert

Be a Champion – Donate Now

Healing in Arts is donor supported

Your financial investment advances awareness to help individuals and communities to heal and to flourish. Tax deductible funds can be donated through New Horizons Foundation.